Brilliant: Watch the Guardian’s interactive documentary on the first world war – video trailer


Ursprünglich veröffentlicht auf HumansinShadow.wordpress.com:

First world war 100 years on

A global guide to the first world war – interactive documentary

Ten historians from 10 countries give a brief history of the first world war through a global lens. Using original news reports, interactive maps and rarely-seen footage, including extraordinary scenes of troops crossing Mesopotamia on camels and Italian soldiers fighting high up in the Alps, the half-hour film explores the war and its effects from many different perspectives. You can watch the documentary in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Arabic or Hindi thanks to our partnership with the British Academy.

Warning: contains images some viewers may find disturbing

WATCH THIS BRILLIANT DOCUMENT HERE: http://www.theguardian.com/world/ng-interactive/2014/jul/23/a-global-guide-to-the-first-world-war-interactive-documentary?CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2

Original ansehen

Dozens of Civilians Killed in Fresh Attacks on Gaza. My Tears belong to the children – NOT TO NATIONALITY


Dozens of Civilians Killed in Fresh Attacks on Gaza.

Dozens of Civilians Killed in Fresh Attacks on Gaza

Video

– Warning –

- Graphic Images –

This video shows the horror and reality of the Israeli attack on the people of Gaza. It should only be viewed by a mature audience.

Posted July 20, 2014

 

 

Note from Tom

Anyone viewing these images will undoubtedly be disturbed and angered by the brutality of the Israeli regime. Posting comments that reflect that anger are acceptable provided the do not condemn a particular race or religion for the atrocities of Zionism.

If you care about the suffering of the Palestinian people and Israel’s disregard for common decency, then you will accept that we all have a responsibility to protest this savagery by taking action.

You can not relieve yourself of that duty by posting comments on this page. Join a local protest, or better still, start a local demonstration to demand that Israel stop the genocide of the Palestinian people.

Peace and Joy

Tom

What’s your response

‘We Stay Together, Or We Leave This World Together” & NOBODY SHOULD BE A NUMBER


‘We Stay Together, Or We Leave This World Together’.

Nobody should be a number: Names of those killed in Gaza

Tuesday, July 8:
1. Mohammed Sha’aban, 24, was killed in a bombing of his car in Gaza City.
2. Ahmad Sha’aban, 30, died in the same bombing.
3. Khadir al-Bashiliki, 45, died in the same bombing.
4. Rashad Yaseen, 27, was killed in a bombing of the Nusseirat refugee camp in central Gaza.
5. Riad Mohammed Kawareh, 50, was killed in a bombing of his family’s home in Khan Younis.
6. Seraj Ayad Abed al-A’al, 8, was wounded in the same bombing and succumbed to his injuries on Tuesday evening.
7. Mohammed Ayman Ashour, 15, died in the same bombing.
8. Bakr Mohammed Joudah, 22, died in the same bombing.
9. Ammar Mohammed Joudah, 26, died in the same bombing.
10. Hussein Yousef Kawareh, 13, died in the same bombing.
11. Mohammed Ibrahim Kawareh, 50, died in the same bombing.
12. Bassim Salim Kawareh, 10, died in the same bombing.
13. Mousa Habib, 16, from Gaza City’s al-Shujaiyah neighborhood, was killed along with his 22-year old cousin while the pair were riding a motorcycle.
14. Mohammed Habib, 22, was killed with Mousa Habib.
15. Sakr Aysh al-Ajouri, 22, was killed in an attack on Jabalia, in northern Gaza.
16. Ahmad Na’el Mehdi, 16, from Gaza City’s Sheikh Radwan neighborhood, was killed in a bombing that wounded two of his friends.
17. Hafiz Mohammed Hamad, 30, an Islamic Jihad commander, was killed in the bombing of his home in Beit Hanoun, along with five of his family members.
18. Ibrahim Mohammed Hamad, 26, died in the same bombing.
19. Mehdi Mohammed Hamad, 46, died in the same bombing.
20. Fawzia Khalil Hamad, 62, died in the same bombing.
21. Dunia Mehdi Hamad, 16, died in the same bombing.
22. Suha Hamad, 25, died in the same bombing.
23. Suleiman Salman Abu Soaween, 22

Wednesday, July 9:
24. Abdelhadi Jamaat al-Sufi, 24, was killed in a bombing near the Rafah crossing.
25. Naifeh Farjallah, 80, was killed in an airstrike on the town of Moghraqa, southwest of Gaza City.
26. Abdelnasser Abu Kweek, 60, was killed in the bombing of Gaza’s central governorate along with his son.
27. Khaled Abu Kweek, 31, Abdelnasser Abu Kweek’s son, was killed in the same bombing.
28. Mohammed Areef, 13, died in a bombing in Sha’af.
28. Amir Areef, 10, died in the same bombing.
30. Mohammed Malakiyeh, 18 months old, died in a bombing along with his mother and a young man.
31. Hana Malakiyeh, 27, Mohammed Malakiyeh’s mother, died in the same bombing.
32. Hatem Abu Salem, 28, died in the same bombing.
33. Mohammed Khaled al-Nimri, 22
34. Sahar Hamdan, 40, died in the bombing of her home in Beit Hanoun.
35. Ibrahim Masri, 14, Sahar Hamdan’s son, was killed in the same bombing.
36. Mahmoud Nahid al-Nawasra was killed in a bombing in al-Meghazi.
37. Mohammed Khalaf al-Nawasra, 4, was killed in the same bombing and arrived at the hospital “in shreds.”
38. Nidal Khalaf al-Nawasra al-Meghazi, 5, was killed in the same bombing.
39. Salah Awwad al-Nawasra al-Meghazi, 6, was killed in the same bombing. His body was found under the rubble of the house.
40. Aisha Nijm al-Meghazi, 20, was killed in the same bombing.
41. Amal Youssef Abdel Ghafour, 27, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis.
42. Ranim Jawde Abdel Ghafour, an 18-month-old girl, was killed in the same bombing.
43. Rashid al-Kafarneh, 30, was killed when the motorcycle he was riding was bombed.
44. Ibrahim Daoud al-Balawi, 24
45. Abdelrahman Jamal al-Zamli, 22
46. Ibrahim Ahmad Abideen, 42
47. Mustafa Abu Mar, 20
48. Khalid Abu Mar, 23
49. Mazen Farj al-Jarbah, 30, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
50. Marwan Slim, 27, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
51. Hani Saleh Hamad, 57, was killed in a bombing in Beit Hanoun along with his son Ibrahim.
52. Ibrahim Hamad, 20, was killed in the same bombing.
53. Salima Hassan Musallim al-Arja, 60, was killed in a bombing in Rafah that wounded five others.
54. Maryam Atieh Mohammed al-Arja, 11, was killed in the same bombing.
55. Hamad Shahab, 37
56. Ibrahim Khalil Qanun, 24, was killed in a bombing of Khan Younis.
57. Mohammed Khalil Qanun, 26, was killed in the same attack.
58. Hamdi Badieh Sawali, 33, was killed in the same attack.
59. Ahmad Sawali, 28, was killed in the same attack.
60. Suleiman Salim al-Astal, 55, was killed in a bombing of Khan Younis.
61. Mohammed al-Aqqad, 24
62. Ra’ed Shalat, 37, was killed in a bombing that wounded 6 others.

Thursday, July 10:
63. Asma Mahmoud al-Hajj, 22, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis that killed eight members of the same family and wounded 16 other people.
64. Basmah Abdelfattah al-Hajj, 57, was wounded in the bombing and succumbed to her injuries shortly afterwards.
65. Mahmoud Lutfi al-Hajj, 58, died in the same bombing.
66. Tarek Mahmoud al-Hajj, 18, died in the same bombing.
67. Sa’ad Mahmoud al-Hajj, 17, died in the same bombing.
68. Najla Mahmoud al-Hajj, 29, died in the same bombing.
69. Fatima Mahmoud al-Hajj, 12, died in the same bombing.
70. Omar Mahmoud al-Hajj, 20, died in the same bombing.
71. Ahmad Salim al-Astal, 24, was killed in the bombing of a beach house in Khan Younis that critically wounded more than 15 people.
72. Mousa Mohammed al-Astal, 50, was killed in the same bombing. The two bodies were recovered four hours after the bombing.
73. Ra’ed al-Zawareh, 33, succumbed to his wounds and died. The location of his death was unreported.
74. Baha’ Abu al-Leil, 35, was killed in a bombing.
75. Salim Qandil, 27, was killed in the same bombing.
76. Omar al-Fyumi, 30, was killed in the same bombing.
77. Abdullah Ramadan Abu Ghazzal, 5, was killed in a bombing in Beit Lahiya.
78. Ismail Hassan Abu Jamah, 19, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis that injured two children, one critically.
79. Hassan Awda Abu Jamah, 75, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis.
80. Mohammed Ahsan Ferwanah, 27, was killed in a bombing in Khan Younis.
81. Yasmin Mohammed Mutawwaq, 4 was killed in a bombing in Beit Hanoun.
82. Mahmoud Wulud, 26, was killed in a bombing of a civilian vehicle in northern Gaza. His remains were taken to Kamal Adwan Hospital in Jabalia.
83. Hazem Balousha, 30, was killed in the same bombing. His remains are at Kamal Adwan Hospital.
84. Nour Rafik Adi al-Sultan, 27, was killed in the same bombing. His remains are at Kamal Adwan Hospital.
85. Ahmad Zaher Hamdan, 24, was killed in a bombing in Beit Hanoun.
86. Mohammed Kamal al-Kahlout, 25, was killed in a bombing in Jabalia.
87. Sami Adnan Shaldan, 25, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
88. Jamah Atieh Shalouf, 25, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
89. Bassem Abdelrahman Khattab, 6, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.
90. Abdullah Mustafa Abu Mahrouk, 22, was killed in a bombing in Deir al-Balah.

Friday, July 11:
91. Anas Rizk Abu al-Kas, 33, was killed in a bombing in Gaza City.
92. Nour Marwan al-Najdi, 10, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
93. Mohammed Mounir Ashour, 25, was killed in a bombing on the al-Ghanam family home in Rafah.
94. Ghalia Deeb Jabr al-Ghanam, 7, was killed in the same bombing.
95. Wasim Abd al-Rizk Hassan al-Ghanam, 23, was killed in the same bombing.
96. Mahmoud Abd al-Rizk Hassan al-Ghanam, 26, was killed in the same bombing.
97. Kifah Shahada Deeb al-Ghanam, 20, was killed in the same bombing.
98. Ra’ed Hani Abu Hani, 31, was killed in a bombing in Rafah.
99. Shahraman Ismail Abu al-Kas, 42, was killed in a bombing in a refugee camp in central Gaza.
100. Mazen Mustafa Aslan, 63, was killed in the same bombing.
101. Mohammed Rabih Abu Humeidan, 65, was killed in shelling that struck northern Gaza.
102. Abdel Halim Ashra, 54, was killed in an airstrike on Wednesday in the area of Birka Deir al-Balah, but his body wasn’t discovered till Friday.
103. Saher Abu Namous, 3, was killed in an airstrike on his home in northern Gaza.
104. Hussein al-Mamlouk, 47, was killed in an airstrike on Gaza City.
105. Saber Sukkar, 80, was killed in an airstrike on Gaza City.
106. Nasser Rabih Mohammed Samamah, 49, was killed in an airstrike on Gaza City.

Saturday, July 12:
107. Rami Abu Massaad, 23, was killed in a strike on Deir al-Balah.
108. Mohammed al-Samiri, 24, was killed in the same attack.
109. Houssam Deeb al-Razayneh, 39, was killed in an attack on Jabalia
110. Anas Youssef Kandil, 17, was killed in the same bombing.
111. Abdel Rahim Saleh al-Khatib, 38, was killed in the same bombing.
112. Youssef Mohammed Kandil, 33, was killed in the same bombing.
113. Mohammed Idriss Abu Saninah, 20, was killed in the same bombing.
114. Hala Wishahi, 31, was killed in an attack on the Mabarra association for the disabled in Jabalia.
115. Suha Abu Saade, 38, was killed in the same attack.
116. Ali Nabil Basal, 32, was killed in a strike on western Gaza city.
117. Mohammed Bassem al-Halabi, 28, was killed in the same strike.
118. Mohammed al-Sowayti (Abu Askar), 20, was killed in the same attack.
119. Ibrahim Nabil Humaide, 30, was killed in a bombing in the Tufah neighborhood in eastern Gaza City.
120. Hassan Ahmed Abu Ghoush, 24, was killed in the same attack.
121. Ahmed Mazen al-Ballaoui, 26, was killed in the same attack

 

 

Orwell’s Dystopian Future Is Almost Here: A Conversation With Glenn Greenwald


Orwell’s Dystopian Future Is Almost Here: A Conversation With Glenn Greenwald.

 

There was of course no way of knowing whether you were being watched at any given moment. How often, or on what system, the Thought Police plugged in on any individual wire was guesswork. It was even conceivable that they watched everybody all the time. But at any rate, they could plug in your wire whenever they wanted to. You had to live—did live, from habit that became instinct—in the assumption that every sound you made was overheard, and, except in darkness, every movement scrutinized.

—“1984,” George Orwell

July 05, 2014 “ICH” – “Truthdig” – - – Investigative journalist Glenn Greenwald, best known for his reporting on the U.S. surveillance state, told me that in the year since he first met whistle-blower Edward Snowden, he went back and re-read Orwell’s dystopian novel “1984.”

In an interview on Uprising, Greenwald said that what surprised him the most about re-reading the ominous story was that “I had always remembered the ubiquity of the surveillance [in ‘1984’], which was we had a monitor in every single room of every home constantly watching every single person. So, a lot of people said, [our world is] not like ‘1984’ because not every single one of our emails is being read and or every one of our calls are being listened to because nobody could possibly be doing all that.” But, as Greenwald rightly pointed out, in Orwell’s world, “nobody actually knew whether they were being watched at all times. In fact they didn’t know if they were ever being watched.”

In essence said Greenwald, “The key to the social control was the possibility that they could be watched at any time.” Although we have no evidence that the Obama administration is engaging in any organized form of social control in our real world, the most dangerous possible outcome of the U.S. surveillance state is a dampening of dissent because of the mere possibility that the government is watching our every move.

In fact, Fourth of July celebrations in Boston this year will be the focus of intense high-tech surveillance, according to media reports. There is, of course, great irony in imposing “Big Brother” tactics on a day that is theoretically meant to symbolize freedom from colonialism and the hard won rights of personal freedoms. Meanwhile, President Obama’s own appointed watchdog panel has given a mostly unreserved thumbs up to the NSA’s programs. Can it get more Orwellian?

Greenwald knows personally how seriously governments take their right to spy on everyone and keep those programs secret. His own partner, David Miranda, was subjected to a detention and search at Heathrow Airport last year, on the premise of Britain’s “national security” interests, and by extension, the U.S.’ Greenwald’s source, Edward Snowden, faces a lifetime of exile and a possible life sentence for charges relating to the Espionage Act. That the intrepid, award-winning journalist is able to tour the nation freely to promote his book “No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA, and the U.S. Surveillance State” is likely due to his deft handling of the news reports he has parceled out, garnering the maximum possible public exposure, and his vociferous defense of his and others’ constitutional rights.

In fact, Greenwald is a former constitutional law and civil rights litigator. During the interview, he rattled off to me the difference between a source and a journalist like it was second nature: “Sources are people in the government who have a specific legal obligation not to disclose things, whereas journalists have been recognized as having a First Amendment privilege.”

But the exercise of that privilege has brought with it criticism from both right-wing and mainstream analysts, including fellow journalists, who see Greenwald’s craft as tainted by too strong a bias. A lengthy exchange between Greenwald and former New York Times Executive Editor Bill Keller in the paper’s op-ed section last year revealed the establishment conviction that good journalism can remain objective. Keller’s position that journalists should “keep their opinions to themselves unless they relocate (as I have done) to the pages clearly identified as the home of opinion” is reflective of a status quo that tends to identify anti-government opinions as bias while blindly accepting nationalistic tendencies as objective. Greenwald’s answer: “Ultimately, the only real metric of journalism that should matter is accuracy and reliability.”

Citing the history of what journalism used to mean, Greenwald told me, “For centuries … [we have had] crusading journalism with highly opinionated people using journalism as a tool to achieve certain social ends.” In fact, said Greenwald, it was “a way that citizens could hold people in power accountable through writing about them … and journalism has always been this kind of opinion-based, passion-driven activity.” After all, Upton Sinclair’s turn-of-the-century muckraking exposés of the seamy side of industries are among the best examples of American journalism.

Not surprisingly, many mainstream journalists who cover Greenwald, Snowden and the stories of NSA surveillance have betrayed their stated objectivity in embarrassingly obvious ways. The New York Times’ review of Greenwald’s new book referred to the author as a “self-righteous sourpuss,” and Snowden as someone with a “sweet, innocently conspiratorial worldview of a precocious teenager” who “appears to yearn for martyrdom.”

Psychological hit pieces against Greenwald and Snowden are common in the mainstream press, while members of Congress and Wall Street executives are rarely treated to the same level of psychoanalysis. For example, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, who was caught telling a lie to Congress over the NSA’s surveillance program, has not received nearly the same level of widespread vitriol as Greenwald and Snowden have. To its credit, the New York Times editorial board did cite Clapper’s lie and referred to Snowden as a “whistle-blower” who “deserves better than a life of permanent exile, fear and flight.” But that stood out as an exception to the widespread denunciations of Greenwald and Snowden (see here, here and here for examples).

In Orwell’s “1984,” traitors to the regime were “thought criminals” who were disgraced by their betrayal of Big Brother. After being singled out as such a criminal, Orwell’s protagonist, Winston, is instructed by his interrogator to believe he is “mentally deranged.” Although the novel is an extreme depiction of a fascist future, many of the tactics adopted by today’s so-called objective journalists to keep dissenters such as Greenwald and Snowden in line are consistent with Orwell’s dark fantasy. By discrediting those who speak out, it is possible to dismiss the substance of their criticisms. But, as Orwell famously wrote, “in a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.”

Sonali Kolhatkar is the host and producer of KPFK Pacifica’s popular morning drive time program Uprising, based in Los Angeles, California. She is also the Co-Director of the Afghan Women’s Mission, a US-based non-profit solidarity organization that funds the social, political, and humanitarian projects of RAWA.