An Executioner for Syria’s Rebels Tells His Story: The Burial Brigade of Homs   : Information Clearing House


 An Executioner for Syria’s Rebels Tells His Story: The Burial Brigade of Homs   : Information Clearing House.

Mystery of Slow Earthquakes Solved?


2009 Earthquakes Located by the NEIC
2009 Earthquakes Located by the NEIC (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Mystery of Slow Earthquakes Solved?.

Richard A. Lovett

for National Geographic News

Published December 9, 2010

For years scientists have known about slow earthquakes—temblors that last days, weeks, or even months.

But do these creeping quakes increase or decrease the threat of „regular“ earthquakes—the big, quick kind? A new study may hold a key to the answer. (See earthquake pictures.)

Read more please …

Until now seismologists have been aware of two major types of slow earthquake, deep and shallow. (Video: Earthquake 101.)

Deep slow earthquakes occur about 18 to 24 miles (30 to 40 kilometers) underground and last several minutes to several days. They produce tiny tremors, each no stronger than 1 or 2 on the magnitude moment scale, which measures earthquakes based on the seismic-wave energy they release.

Mysterious child disease in Uganda – English pravda.ru


Mysterious child disease in Uganda – English pravda.ru.

Mysterious child disease in Uganda

24.03.2012
 
Mysterious child disease in Uganda. 46901.jpeg

Mysterious disease that affects children devastates northeastern Uganda

by Sonya Hepinstall

Health officials have been researching the possible causes of the disease since 2009, without success…

Nancy Lamwaka has bruises all over her body because she lost the ability to recognize danger. Most mornings, Michael Odongkara takes his daughter out of the house and ties the girl’s ankle to a tree. It is not something he enjoys doing.

But the disease that causes violent seizures so decreased both the mental capacity of the child, age 12, that she no longer speaks, and often gets lost along the way. She once got lost in the woods for three days.

„It hurts so much to tie my own daughter to a tree … but I am forced to do it because I want to save her life. I do not want her to get lost and die in a fire, or walk and drown in the swamps nearby“ he said.

Lamwaka suffers from a disease that is being called

„nodding syndrome“ or zombie disease

(in literal translation). It is of unknown origin and has no cure. The authorities of Uganda estimate that more than three thousand children have been affected.